Making Our Voices Heard on Election Day

Making Our Voices Heard on Election Day
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As we approach this year’s midterm election, I’ve announced—as I did in 2016—a company-wide paid day off. It is extremely important to me that we enable those around us to fulfill their civic duty, and that we together play a role in recentering the U.S. as the nation that at its core welcomes opportunity and innovation. We are living in a political environment marked by behavior, dynamics and communications unlike those we’ve seen from leaders in this country before. Dialogue feels polarizing at best.

Typing, posting and commenting have taken up too much of our time and intellectual bandwidth—we simply cannot fail to vote and keep screaming into the abyss of the internet hoping for change. I wrote in 2016 about why, on a personal level, fulfilling political responsibilities is hugely important to me. This is still very true. I am, however, even more alarmed and disappointed in our elected officials—as well as their potential replacements—for continuing to stoop even lower in their communications with the public, diluting the important issues with sound-byte propaganda and well-crafted tweets. Election Day is an opportunity to make our voices heard, as well as keep everyone accountable.

Finally, a personal point of view that I think often gets forgotten: government is filled with hard-working folks looking to serve with the highest sense of responsibility. When we elect politicians, we elect the leaders of these individuals. We choose the people who craft their mandates and shape their day-to-day. We have to be mindful that not everything in government is political. There is a sense of duty exhibited by the very best of our civil servants that we should be diligently screening for in everyone of their leaders. I hope we can all find it tomorrow despite the noise around us.